About Satish Salian

Satish Salian
Satish Salian is a Sr. Software Engineering Manager at NVIDIA responsible for CUDA tools and developer experience. Satish has twelve years of experience creating various tools and SDKs at NVIDIA. He has a Bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering from University of Pune, India.
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NVIDIA Nsight Eclipse Edition for Jetson TK1

NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition is a full-featured, integrated development environment that lets you easily develop CUDA® applications for either your local (x86) system or a remote (x86 or ARM) target. In this post, I will walk you through the process of remote-developing CUDA applications for the NVIDIA Jetson TK1, an ARM-based development kit.

Nsight supports two remote development modes: cross-compilation and “synchronize projects” mode. Cross-compiling for ARM on your x86 host system requires that all of the ARM libraries with which you will link your application be present on your host system. In synchronize-projects mode, on the other hand, your source code is synchronized between host and target systems and compiled and linked directly on the remote target, which has the advantage that all your libraries get resolved on the target system and need not be present on the host. Neither of these remote development modes requires an NVIDIA GPU to be present in your host system.

Note: CUDA cross-compilation tools for ARM are available only in the Ubuntu 12.04 DEB package of the CUDA 6 Toolkit.  If your host system is running a Linux distribution other than Ubuntu 12.04, I recommend the synchronize-projects remote development mode, which I will cover in detail in a later blog post.

CUDA toolkit setup

The first step involved in cross-compilation is installing the CUDA 6 Toolkit on your host system. To get started, let’s download the required Ubuntu 12.04 DEB package from the CUDA download page. Installation instructions can be found in the Getting Started Guide for Linux, but I will summarize them below for CUDA 6.
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