Introducing the NVIDIA OpenACC Toolkit

Programmability is crucial to accelerated computing, and NVIDIA’s CUDA Toolkit has been critical to the success of GPU computing. Over 3 million CUDA Toolkits have been downloaded since its first launch. However there are many scientists and researchers yet to benefit from GPU computing. These scientists have limited time to learn and apply a parallel programming language, and they often have huge existing code bases that must remain portable across platforms. Today NVIDIA is introducing the new OpenACC Toolkit to help these researchers and scientists achieve science and engineering goals faster.

Over the last few years OpenACC has established itself as a higher-level approach to GPU acceleration that is simple, powerful, and portable. The membership of the OpenACC organization has grown to include accelerator manufacturers, tools vendors, supercomputing centers and education institutions. The OpenACC 2.0 specification significantly expands the functionality and improves the portability of OpenACC and is now available in many commercial tools.

The NVIDIA OpenACC toolkit provides the tools and documentation that scientists and researchers need to be successful with OpenACC. The toolkit includes a free OpenACC compiler for university developers to remove any barriers for use by academics.

The new OpenACC Toolkit includes the following in a single package. Continue reading


MapD: Massive Throughput Database Queries with LLVM on GPUs

Note: this post was co-written by Alex Şuhan and Todd Mostak of MapD.

At MapD our goal is to build the world’s fastest big data analytics and visualization platform that enables lag-free interactive exploration of multi-billion row datasets. MapD supports standard SQL queries as well as a visualization API that maps OpenGL primitives onto SQL result sets.

Although MapD is fast running on x86-64 CPUs, our real advantage stems from our ability to leverage the massive parallelism and memory bandwidth of GPUs. The most powerful GPU currently available is the NVIDIA Tesla K80 Accelerator, with up to 8.74 teraflops of compute performance and nearly 500 GB/sec of memory bandwidth. By supporting up to eight of these cards per server we see orders-of-magnitude better performance on standard data analytics tasks, enabling a user to visually filter and aggregate billions of rows in tens of milliseconds, all without indexing. The following Video shows the MapD dashboard, showing 750 million tweets animated in real time. Nothing in this demo is pre-computed or canned. Our big data visual analytics platform is running on 8 NVIDIA Tesla K40 GPUs on a single server to power the dashboard.

Fast hardware is only half of the story, so at MapD we have invested heavily into optimizing our code such that a wide range of analytic workloads run optimally on GPUs. In particular, we have worked hard so that common SQL analytic operations, such as filtering (WHERE) and GROUP BY, run as fast as possible. One of the biggest payoffs in this regard has been moving from the query interpreter that we used in our prototype to a JIT (Just-In-Time) compilation framework built on LLVM. LLVM allows us to transform query plans into architecture-independent intermediate code (LLVM IR) and then use any of the LLVM architecture-specific “backends” to compile that IR code for the needed target, such as NVIDIA GPUs, x64 CPUs, and ARM CPUs.

Query compilation has the following advantages over an interpreter:

  1. Since it is inefficient to evaluate a query plan for a single row at a time (in one “dispatch”), an interpreter requires the use of extra buffers to store the intermediate results of evaluating an expression. For example, to evaluate the expression x*2+3, an interpreter-based query engine would first evaluate x*2 for a number of rows, storing that to an intermediate buffer. The intermediate results stored in that buffer would then be read and summed with 3 to get the final result. Writing and reading these intermediate results to memory wastes memory bandwidth and/or valuable cache space. Compare this to a compiled query which can simply store the result of the first subexpression (x*2) into a register before computing the final result, allowing the cache to be used for other purposes, for example to create the hash table necessary for a query’s GROUP BY clause. This is related to loop fusion and kernel fusion compiler optimizations. Continue reading

The Next Wave of Enterprise Performance with Java, POWER Systems and NVIDIA GPUs

The Java ecosystem is the leading enterprise software development platform, with widespread industry support and deployment on platforms like the IBM WebSphere Application Server product family. Java provides a powerful object-oriented programming language with a large developer ecosystem and developer-friendly features like automated memory management, program safety, security and runtime portability, and high performance features like just-in-time (JIT) compilation.

Java application developers face increasingly complex challenges, with big data and analytics workloads that require next generation performance. Big data pushes the scale of the problem to a new level with multiple hundreds of gigabytes of information common in these applications, while analytics drive the need for higher computation speeds. The Java platform has evolved by adding developer support for simpler parallel programming via the fork/join framework and concurrent collection APIs. Most recently, Java 8 adds support for lambda expressions, which can simplify the creation of highly parallel applications using Java.

IBM's new Power S824L is a data processing powerhouse that integrates the NVIDIA Tesla Accelerated Computing Platform (Tesla GPUs and enabling software) with IBM’s POWER8 processor.
IBM’s new Power S824L is a data processing powerhouse that integrates the NVIDIA Tesla Accelerated Computing Platform (Tesla GPUs and enabling software) with IBM’s POWER8 processor.

IBM’s POWER group has partnered with NVIDIA to make GPUs available on a high-performance server platform, promising the next generation of parallel performance for Java applications. We decided to bring GPU support to Java incrementally using three approaches.

Enabling CUDA for Java Developers

Our first step brings capabilities of the CUDA programming model into the Java programming environment. Java developers familiar with CUDA concepts can use the new IBM CUDA4J library, which provides a Java API for managing and accessing GPU devices, libraries, kernels, and memory. Using these new APIs it is possible to write Java programs that manage GPU device characteristics and offload work to the GPU with the convenience of the Java memory model, exceptions, and automatic resource management that Java developers expect. Continue reading


Separate Compilation and Linking of CUDA C++ Device Code

This Post was Co-Written by Tony Scudiero and Mike Murphy.

Managing complexity in large programs requires breaking them down into components that are responsible for small, well-defined portions of the overall program. Separate compilation is an integral part of the C and C++ programming languages which allows portions of a program to be compiled into separate objects and then linked together to form an executable or library. Developing large and complex GPU programs is no different, and starting with CUDA 5.0, separate compilation and linking are now important tools in the repertoire of CUDA C/C++ programmers.

In this post, we explore separate compilation and linking of device code and highlight situations where it is helpful. In the process, we’ll walk through a simple example to show how device code linking can let you move existing code to the GPU with minimal changes to your class hierarchy and build infrastructure.

One of the key limitations that device code linking lifts is the need to have all the code for a GPU kernel present when compiling the kernel, including all the device functions that the kernel calls. As C++ programmers, we are used to calling externally defined functions simply by declaring the functions’ prototypes (or including a header that declares them).

Managing Complexity with Separate Compilation

The common approach to organizing and building C++ applications is to define all member functions of a single class in one or more .cpp source files, and compile each .cpp source file into a separate .o object file. Other classes and functions may call these member functions from anywhere in the program by including the class header file; the function implementation is not needed to compile another function that calls it. After compiling all code, the linker connects calls to functions implemented in other files as part of the process of generating the executable.

Let’s imagine a very simple example application which has two classes: a particle class and a three-dimensional vector class, v3, that it uses. Our main task is moving the particle objects along randomized trajectories. Particle filters and Monte Carlo simulations frequently involve operations of this sort. We’ll use a CUDA C++ kernel in which each thread calls particle::advance() on a particle. Continue reading


CUDA Pro Tip: Understand Fat Binaries and JIT Caching

As NVIDIA GPUs evolve to support new features, the instruction set architecture naturally changes. Because applications must run on multiple generations of GPUs, the NVIDIA compiler tool chain supports compiling for multiple architectures in the same application executable or library. CUDA also relies on the PTX virtual GPU ISA to provide forward compatibility, so that already deployed applications can run on future GPU architectures. In this post I will give you a basic understanding of CUDA “fat binaries” and compilation for multiple GPU architectures, as well as just-in-time PTX compilation for forward compatibility.

nvcc, the CUDA compiler driver, uses a two-stage compilation model. The first stage compiles source device code to PTX virtual assembly, and the second stage compiles the PTX to binary code for the target architecture. The CUDA driver can execute the second stage compilation at run time, compiling the PTX virtual assembly “Just In Time” to run it. This JIT compilation can cause delay at application start-up time (or more accurately, CUDA context creation time). CUDA uses two approaches to mitigate start-up overhead on JIT compilation: fat binaries and JIT caching.

Fat Binaries

The first approach is to completely avoid the JIT cost by including binary code for one or more architectures in the application binary along with PTX code. The CUDA run time looks for code for the present GPU architecture in the binary, and runs it if found. If binary code is not found but PTX is available, then the driver compiles the PTX code. In this way deployed CUDA applications can support new GPUs when they come out. Continue reading