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Remote application development using NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition

NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition (NSEE) is a full-featured unified CPU+GPU integrated development environment(IDE) that lets you easily develop CUDA applications for either your local (x86_64) system or a remote (x86_64 or ARM) target system. In my last post on remote development of CUDA applications, I covered NSEE’s cross compilation mode. In this post I will focus on the using NSEE’s synchronized project mode.

For remote development of CUDA applications using synchronized-project mode, you can edit code on the host system and synchronize it with the target system. In this scenario, the code is compiled natively on the target system as Figure 1 shows.

CUDA application development usage scenarios with Nsight Eclipse Edition
Figure 1: CUDA application development usage scenarios with Nsight Eclipse Edition

In synchronized project mode the host system does not need an ARM cross-compilation tool chain, so you have the flexibility to use Mac OS X or any of the CUDA supported x86_64 Linux platforms as the host system. The remote target system can be a CUDA-supported x86_64 Linux target or an ARM-based platform like the Jetson TK1 system. I am using Mac OS X 10.8.5 on my host system (with Xcode 5.1.1 installed) and 64-bit Ubuntu 12.04 on my target system. Continue reading

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NVIDIA Nsight Eclipse Edition for Jetson TK1

NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition is a full-featured, integrated development environment that lets you easily develop CUDA® applications for either your local (x86) system or a remote (x86 or ARM) target. In this post, I will walk you through the process of remote-developing CUDA applications for the NVIDIA Jetson TK1, an ARM-based development kit.

Nsight supports two remote development modes: cross-compilation and “synchronize projects” mode. Cross-compiling for ARM on your x86 host system requires that all of the ARM libraries with which you will link your application be present on your host system. In synchronize-projects mode, on the other hand, your source code is synchronized between host and target systems and compiled and linked directly on the remote target, which has the advantage that all your libraries get resolved on the target system and need not be present on the host. Neither of these remote development modes requires an NVIDIA GPU to be present in your host system.

Note: CUDA cross-compilation tools for ARM are available only in the Ubuntu 12.04 DEB package of the CUDA 6 Toolkit.  If your host system is running a Linux distribution other than Ubuntu 12.04, I recommend the synchronize-projects remote development mode, which I will cover in detail in a later blog post.

CUDA toolkit setup

The first step involved in cross-compilation is installing the CUDA 6 Toolkit on your host system. To get started, let’s download the required Ubuntu 12.04 DEB package from the CUDA download page. Installation instructions can be found in the Getting Started Guide for Linux, but I will summarize them below for CUDA 6.
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CUDACasts Episode 13: Clock, Power, and Thermal Profiling with Nsight Eclipse Edition

In the world of high-performance computing, it is important to understand how your code affects the operating characteristics of your HW.  For example, if your program executes inefficient code, it may cause the GPU to work harder than it needs to, leading to higher power consumption, and a potential slow-down due to throttling.

A new profiling feature in CUDA 5.5 allows you to profile the clocks, power, and thermal characteristics of the GPU as it executes your code.  This feature is available in the NVIDIA Visual Profiler on Linux and 64-bit Windows 7/8 and NSight Eclipse Edition on Linux.  Learn how to activate and use this feature by watching CUDACasts Episode 13.

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CUDACasts Episode #9: Explore GPU device memory with Nsight Eclipse Edition

Visual tools offer a very efficient method for developing and debugging applications. When working on massively parallel codes built on the CUDA Platform, this visual approach is even more important because you could be dealing with tens of thousands of parallel threads.

With the free NVIDIA Nsight Eclipse Edition IDE, you can quickly and easily examine the GPU memory state in a running CUDA C or C++ application. In today’s CUDACast, we continue our CUDA 5.5 series with a look at this new feature available to Eclipse users.

In the next few weeks, we’ll take a break from the CUDA 5.5 new feature series and explore some other topics, such as writing CUDA applications in pure Python. Stay tuned!

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