ArrayFire Logo

ArrayFire: A Portable Open-Source Accelerated Computing Library

The ArrayFire library is a high-performance software library with a focus on portability and productivity. It supports highly tuned, GPU-accelerated algorithms using an easy-to-use API. ArrayFire wraps GPU memory into a simple “array” object, enabling developers to process vectors, matrices, and volumes on the GPU using high-level routines, without having to get involved with device kernel code.

ArrayFire Capabilities

ArrayFire is an open source C/C++ library, with language bindings for R, Java and Fortran. ArrayFire has a range of functionality, including

ArrayFire has three back ends to enable portability across many platforms: CUDA, OpenCL and CPU. It even works on embedded platforms like NVIDIA’s Jetson TK1.

In a past post about ArrayFire we demonstrated the ArrayFire capabilities and how you can increase your productivity by using ArrayFire. In this post I will tell you how you can use ArrayFire to exploit various kind of parallelism on NVIDIA GPUs. Continue reading

Rlogo

Accelerate R Applications with CUDA

R is a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics that provides a programming language and built-in libraries of mathematics operations for statistics, data analysis, machine learning and much more. Many domain experts and researchers use the R platform and contribute R software, resulting in a large ecosystem of free software packages available through CRAN (the Comprehensive R Archive Network).

However, R, like many other high-level languages, is not performance competitive out of the box with lower-level languages like C++, especially for highly data- and computation-intensive applications. R programs tend to process large amounts of data, and often have significant independent data and task parallelism. Therefore, R applications stand to benefit from GPU acceleration. This way, R users can benefit from R’s high-level, user-friendly interface while achieving high performance.

In this article, I will introduce the computation model of R with GPU acceleration, focusing on three topics:

  • accelerating R computations using CUDA libraries;
  • calling your own parallel algorithms written in CUDA C/C++ or CUDA Fortran from R; and
  • profiling GPU-accelerated R applications using the CUDA Profiler.

The GPU-Accelerated R Software Stack

Figure 1 shows that there are two ways to apply the computational power of GPUs in R:

  1. use R GPU packages from CRAN; or
  2. access the GPU through CUDA libraries and/or CUDA-accelerated programming languages, including C, C++ and Fortran.
modelFigure 1: The R + GPU software stack.

The first approach is to use existing GPU-accelerated R packages listed under High-Performance and Parallel Computing with R on the CRAN site. Examples include gputools and cudaBayesreg. These packages are very easy to install and use. On the other hand, the number of GPU packages is currently limited, quality varies, and only a few domains are covered. This will improve with time.

The second approach is to use the GPU through CUDA directly. Continue reading