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12 Things You Should Know about the Tesla Accelerated Computing Platform

You may already know NVIDIA Tesla as a line of GPU accelerator boards optimized for high-performance, general-purpose computing. They are used for parallel scientific, engineering, and technical computing, and they are designed for deployment in supercomputers, clusters, and workstations. But it’s not just the GPU boards that make Tesla a great computing solution. The combination of the world’s fastest GPU accelerators, the widely used CUDA parallel computing model, and a comprehensive ecosystem of software developers, software vendors, and data center system OEMs make Tesla the leading platform for accelerating data analytics and scientific computing.

The Tesla Accelerated Computing Platform provides advanced system management features and accelerated communication technology, and it is supported by popular infrastructure management software. These enable HPC professionals to easily deploy and manage Tesla accelerators in the data center. Tesla-accelerated applications are powered by CUDA, NVIDIA’s pervasive parallel computing platform and programming model, which provides application developers with a comprehensive suite of tools for productive, high-performance software development.

This post gives an overview of the broad range of technologies, tools, and components of the Tesla Accelerated Computing Platform that are available to application developers. Here’s what you need to know about the Tesla Platform. Continue reading

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Remote application development using NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition

NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition (NSEE) is a full-featured unified CPU+GPU integrated development environment(IDE) that lets you easily develop CUDA applications for either your local (x86_64) system or a remote (x86_64 or ARM) target system. In my last post on remote development of CUDA applications, I covered NSEE’s cross compilation mode. In this post I will focus on the using NSEE’s synchronized project mode.

For remote development of CUDA applications using synchronized-project mode, you can edit code on the host system and synchronize it with the target system. In this scenario, the code is compiled natively on the target system as Figure 1 shows.

CUDA application development usage scenarios with Nsight Eclipse Edition
Figure 1: CUDA application development usage scenarios with Nsight Eclipse Edition

In synchronized project mode the host system does not need an ARM cross-compilation tool chain, so you have the flexibility to use Mac OS X or any of the CUDA supported x86_64 Linux platforms as the host system. The remote target system can be a CUDA-supported x86_64 Linux target or an ARM-based platform like the Jetson TK1 system. I am using Mac OS X 10.8.5 on my host system (with Xcode 5.1.1 installed) and 64-bit Ubuntu 12.04 on my target system. Continue reading

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CUDA Pro Tip: Profiling MPI Applications

When I profile MPI+CUDA applications, sometimes performance issues only occur for certain MPI ranks. To fix these, it’s necessary to identify the MPI rank where the performance issue occurs. Before CUDA 6.5 it was hard to do this because the CUDA profiler only shows the PID of the processes and leaves the developer to figure out the mapping from PIDs to MPI ranks. Although the mapping can be done manually, for example for OpenMPI via the command-line option --display-map, it’s tedious and error prone. A solution which solves this for the command-line output of nvprof is described here http://www.parallel-computing.pro/index.php/9-cuda/5-sorting-cuda-profiler-output-of-the-mpi-cuda-program . In this post I will describe how the new output file naming of nvprof to be introduced with CUDA 6.5 can be used to conveniently analyze the performance of a MPI+CUDA application with nvprof and the NVIDIA Visual Profiler (nvvp).

Profiling MPI applications with nvprof and nvvp

Collecting data with nvprof

nvprof supports dumping the profile to a file which can be later imported into nvvp. To generate a profile for a MPI+CUDA application I simply start nvprof with the MPI launcher and up to CUDA 6 I used the string “%p” in the output file name. nvprof automatically replaces that string with the PID and generates a separate file for each MPI rank. With CUDA 6.5, the string “%q{ENV}” can be used to name the output file of nvprof. This allows us to include the MPI rank in the output file name by utilizing environment variables automatically set by the MPI launcher (mpirun or mpiexec). E.g. for OpenMPI OMPI_COMM_WORLD_RANK is set to the MPI rank for each launched process.

$ mpirun -np 2 nvprof -o simpleMPI.%q{OMPI_COMM_WORLD_RANK}.nvprof ./simpleMPI
Running on 2 nodes
==18811== NVPROF is profiling process 18811, command: ./simpleMPI
==18813== NVPROF is profiling process 18813, command: ./simpleMPI
Average of square roots is: 0.667279
PASSED
==18813== Generated result file: simpleMPI.1.nvprof
==18811== Generated result file: simpleMPI.0.nvprof

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NVIDIA Nsight Eclipse Edition for Jetson TK1

NVIDIA® Nsight™ Eclipse Edition is a full-featured, integrated development environment that lets you easily develop CUDA® applications for either your local (x86) system or a remote (x86 or ARM) target. In this post, I will walk you through the process of remote-developing CUDA applications for the NVIDIA Jetson TK1, an ARM-based development kit.

Nsight supports two remote development modes: cross-compilation and “synchronize projects” mode. Cross-compiling for ARM on your x86 host system requires that all of the ARM libraries with which you will link your application be present on your host system. In synchronize-projects mode, on the other hand, your source code is synchronized between host and target systems and compiled and linked directly on the remote target, which has the advantage that all your libraries get resolved on the target system and need not be present on the host. Neither of these remote development modes requires an NVIDIA GPU to be present in your host system.

Note: CUDA cross-compilation tools for ARM are available only in the Ubuntu 12.04 DEB package of the CUDA 6 Toolkit.  If your host system is running a Linux distribution other than Ubuntu 12.04, I recommend the synchronize-projects remote development mode, which I will cover in detail in a later blog post.

CUDA toolkit setup

The first step involved in cross-compilation is installing the CUDA 6 Toolkit on your host system. To get started, let’s download the required Ubuntu 12.04 DEB package from the CUDA download page. Installation instructions can be found in the Getting Started Guide for Linux, but I will summarize them below for CUDA 6.
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CUDACasts Episode 19: CUDA 6 Guided Performance Analysis with the Visual Profiler

One of the main reasons for accelerating code on an NVIDIA GPU is for an increase in application performance. This is why it’s important to use the best tools available to help you get the performance you’re looking for. CUDA 6 includes great improvements to the guided analysis tool in the NVIDIA Visual Profiler. Watch today’s CUDACast to see how to use guided analysis to locate potential optimizations for your GPU code.

You can find the code used in this video in the CUDACasts GitHub repository.

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5 Powerful New Features in CUDA 6

Today I’m excited to announce the release of CUDA 6, a new version of the CUDA Toolkit that includes some of the most significant new functionality in the history of CUDA. In this brief post I will share with you the most important new features in CUDA 6 and tell you where to get more information. You may also want to watch the recording of my talk “CUDA 6 and Beyond” from last month’s GPU Technology Conference, embedded below.

Without further ado, if you are ready to download the CUDA Toolkit version 6.0 now, by all means, go get it on CUDA Zone. The five most important new features of CUDA 6 are

  • support for Unified Memory;
  • CUDA on Tegra K1 mobile/embedded system-on-a-chip;
  • XT and Drop-In library interfaces;
  • remote development in NSight Eclipse Edition;
  • many improvements to the CUDA developer tools.

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CUDACasts Episode 14: Racecheck Analysis with CUDA 5.5

The key to the power of GPUs is their 1000′s of parallel processors that execute threads. Anyone who has worked with even a handful of threads know how easy it can be to introduce race conditions, and how difficult it  can be to debug and fix these errors. Because a modern GPU can have thousands of simultaneously executing threads, NVIDIA engineers felt it was imperative to create an incredibly powerful tool for detecting and debugging race conditions.

This racecheck tool comes as part of the cuda-memcheck command-line utility. In CUDA 5.5 a new racecheck analysis mode presents much more human-readable analysis of your code, even reporting which source lines conflict with other lines. In this episode of CUDACasts we use a simple version of Conway’s Game of Life to show the new racecheck features cuda-memcheck. We’ll start with a few race condition bugs, and then use the analysis tool to find and fix them.

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CUDACasts Episode 13: Clock, Power, and Thermal Profiling with Nsight Eclipse Edition

In the world of high-performance computing, it is important to understand how your code affects the operating characteristics of your HW.  For example, if your program executes inefficient code, it may cause the GPU to work harder than it needs to, leading to higher power consumption, and a potential slow-down due to throttling.

A new profiling feature in CUDA 5.5 allows you to profile the clocks, power, and thermal characteristics of the GPU as it executes your code.  This feature is available in the NVIDIA Visual Profiler on Linux and 64-bit Windows 7/8 and NSight Eclipse Edition on Linux.  Learn how to activate and use this feature by watching CUDACasts Episode 13.

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CUDA Pro Tip: nvprof is Your Handy Universal GPU Profiler

CUDA 5 added a powerful new tool to the CUDA Toolkit: nvprof. nvprof is a command-line profiler available for Linux, Windows, and OS X. At first glance, nvprof seems to be just a GUI-less version of the graphical profiling features available in the NVIDIA Visual Profiler and NSight Eclipse edition. But nvprof is much more than that; to me, nvprof is the light-weight profiler that reaches where other tools can’t.

Use nvprof for Quick Checks

I often find myself wondering if my CUDA application is running as I expect it to. Sometimes this is just a sanity check: is the app running kernels on the GPU at all? Is it performing excessive memory copies? By running my application with nvprof ./myApp, I can quickly see a summary of all the kernels and memory copies that it used, as shown in the following sample output.

    ==9261== Profiling application: ./tHogbomCleanHemi
    ==9261== Profiling result:
    Time(%)      Time     Calls       Avg       Min       Max  Name
     58.73%  737.97ms      1000  737.97us  424.77us  1.1405ms  subtractPSFLoop_kernel(float const *, int, float*, int, int, int, int, int, int, int, float, float)
     38.39%  482.31ms      1001  481.83us  475.74us  492.16us  findPeakLoop_kernel(MaxCandidate*, float const *, int)
      1.87%  23.450ms         2  11.725ms  11.721ms  11.728ms  [CUDA memcpy HtoD]
      1.01%  12.715ms      1002  12.689us  2.1760us  10.502ms  [CUDA memcpy DtoH]

In its default summary mode, nvprof presents an overview of the GPU kernels and memory copies in your application. The summary groups all calls to the same kernel together, presenting the total time and percentage of the total application time for each kernel. In addition to summary mode, nvprof supports GPU-Trace and API-Trace modes that let you see a complete list of all kernel launches and memory copies, and in the case of API-Trace mode, all CUDA API calls. Continue reading

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CUDA Pro Tip: Generate Custom Application Profile Timelines with NVTX

The last time you used the timeline feature in the NVIDIA Visual Profiler or NSight to analyze a complex application, you might have wished to see a bit more than just CUDA API calls and GPU kernels. Most applications do significant work on both the CPU and GPU, so it would be nice to see in more detail what CPU functions are taking time. This can help identify the sources of idle GPU time, for example.

In this post I will show you how you can use the NVIDIA Tools Extension (NVTX) to annotate the time line with useful information. I will demonstrate how to add time ranges by calling the NVTX API from your application or library. This can be a tedious task for complex applications with deeply nested call-graphs, so I will also explain how to use compiler instrumentation to automate this task.

What is the NVIDIA Tools Extension (NVTX)?

The NVIDIA Tools Extension (NVTX) is an application interface to the NVIDIA Profiling tools, including the NVIDIA Visual Profiler, NSight Eclipse Edition, and NSight Visual Studio Edition. NVTX allows you to annotate the profiler time line with events and ranges and to customize their appearance and assign names to resources such as CPU threads and devices.

Let’s use the following source code as the basis for our example. (This code is incomplete, but complete examples are available in the Parallel Forall Github repository.) Continue reading